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What is reverse phone number directory?

In contrast with a standard telephone directory, reverse phone directory is a collection of phone numbers and the names or even addresses associated with the numbers. In the standard telephone directory we use the name and address of a person to find their telephone number.

In the reverse phone directory we have the phone number and we want to identify the name and address of a person who called us. If you don't know who the number belongs to, reverse phone search will be a good option to check it out.

How does reverse phone number lookup work?

To identify the number you don't know, first you have to type 'reverse phone lookup' on the browser, then type the unknown number in the search field, click the search button and you'll get the results. You will find all the details linked to the unknown number.

The results will include the phone owner's name and address and sometimes the exact location. You can use websites which are paid or free of charge. But remember, if you use options which are free, the data will be probably limited to the name and address and location of the unknown landline number.


who-called.us was created in order to find as much data as possible about an unknown number and protect you against harassing phones.

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Check an unknown number

Before you receive a call from an unknown number check who is calling.

To learn more about an unknown number on our website, type the number above and press 'Search' button. If the number is in our database, you will quickly find out all the details connected with it. If you want you can also add comments about an unknown number in order to inform other users.

Never call back the unknown number

You may be exposed to the so-called Ping Call (Your phone calls once or twice and stops. When you call back the unknown number you can be charged. It is a very popular telephone fraud)

How to recognize scam call ?

  • The caller says you’ve been selected to receive a grant for something from the government, but you need to pay a processing fee

  • The caller may say you’ve won a free vacation or some other prize, but there’s a shipping or handling fee, so they need your credit card information to send it to you

  • If you get a call from someone selling tickets to a big-prize lottery from another country

  • Caller trying to get you to buy something over the phone will offer a bonus or free gift if you purchase what they’re selling right away

  • If you miss a call from an unfamiliar number and it only rang once, don’t call back out of curiosity. It can redirects you to a pay-per-minute number that plays a fake recorded message

  • They offer to fix your computer

  • They’re collecting for a charity you’ve never heard of. Fake charities will insist on your credit card number

  • They want your personal information

  • They are collecting a debt which you don’t remember incurring

  • They want you to invest in something

  • They want your credit card data

What is Social Security Number Scam (SSN Scam) ?

Nearly all of your financial and medical records are connected to your Social Security number, which is why data thieves are constantly trying to nab it for use in fraud schemes or for selling it illicitly.

Robocall scammers use spoofing to deliberately falsify the caller ID that appears on your phone, disguising their identities in attempts to steal your Social Security number and other valuable personal information. Often the scammers spoof a Social Security Administration phone number so you'll think it's the agency calling. The SSA recently posted a warning about this scam on its blog.

Here's what to know about SSN Scam:

  • SSA will never call to threaten your benefits or tell you to wire money, send cash, or put money on gift cards. Anyone who tells you to do those things is a scammer. Every time.

  • Your Social Security number is not about to be suspended. You don't have to verify your number to anyone who calls out of the blue. And your bank accounts are not about to be seized.

  • The real SSA number is 1-800-772-1213, but scammers are putting that number in the caller ID. If you're worried about what the caller says, hang up and call 1-800-772-1213 to speak to the real SSA. Even if the wait time is long, confirm with the real SSA before responding to one of these calls.

  • Never give any part of your Social Security number to anyone who contacts you. Or your bank account or credit card number.

What is IRS Scam ?

IRS impersonation scams involve scammers targeting American taxpayers by pretending to be Internal Revenue Service (IRS) collection officers. The scammers operate by placing disturbing official-sounding calls to unsuspecting citizens, threatening them with arrest and frozen assets if thousands of dollars are not paid immediately.

Thousands of people have lost millions of dollars and their personal information to tax scams. Scammers use the regular mail, telephone, or email to set up individuals, businesses, payroll and tax professionals. The IRS doesn't initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information.

The IRS isn't exactly modern. If it needs to get in touch with a taxpayer, it sends a letter - not an email, not a phone call, and definitely not a message over social media. Especially in cases of tax fraud. Never return a phone call from someone claiming to be with the IRS.

The US Department of Justice says the IRS never discusses personal tax issues through unsolicited emails or texts, or over social media. Always be wary if you are contacted by someone claiming to be from the IRS who says you owe money. If you think you are a victim of identity theft or tax fraud, you should report it to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. The IRS also has detailed instructions on what to do if you are a victim of tax fraud.

What is Students Loan Scam Scam ?

There are a lot of companies that advertise that they can help you with your loans – you might see the ads on Facebook, on Google, or even in the mail. These companies might promise you things or advertise some type of help for your student loan debt which might entice you to call or sign up.

Remember this: you don’t ever have to pay someone to get help with your Federal student loans if you don’t want to. Not that help is not available, but it’s up to you to decide if you want to do it on your own, or hire a professional organization to handle it for you.

There are few types of Students Loan Scam

  • Advanced Fee Scam​ - this scam involves a student loan company that tells you they can get you the "best" interest rate and loan terms, but you have to pay a "small" fee up front for this service. The fee can be anywhere from 1-5% of the loan amount.

  • Loan Consolidation Scam - After you graduate, it might be a good idea to consolidate your student loans. This is another area that is ripe with scams. The most common student loan consolidation scam is one in which the company charges a consolidation fee, but actually does nothing. The fee is sometimes called processing fees, administrative fees, or consolidation fees.

  • Student Loan Debt Elimination Scam - The important thing to remember about student loan debt is that it must always be repaid - it cannot be eliminated unless you have a federally qualifying reason (death, permanent disability, school closure, falsification of documents or identity theft). If you come across a company that promises to get your student loan debt eliminated, it is a scam.

What is Debt collector ?

What if the number that is calling you belongs to a debt collector ? No one likes answering such phone calls. It is always stressful and frightening. If you decide to answer such calls, remember you have to be prepared for the conversation. You have to find out what your legal rights are.

Surely, you have to make sure you will have enough time to talk. If not, you can always tell them to call you back at more convenient time. Before the conversation, visit some professional websites that will give you an idea how to talk with a debt collector. You will be advised to follow certain obligatory steps that will protect you in the future.

What is Scam call ?

Another nuisance is phone scams. If you have a lot of missed calls from the same number you are unfamiliar with, do not call it back. It is very probable that it is a scam call. The problem with such calls is that they are very difficult to recognise. They are very similar to ordinary numbers.

Our website will help you to recognise at least some of them. If you decide to call the unknown number back, and you realise that there is nobody on the other end, hang up immediately. Otherwise, you may be charged high connection fees because very often such call is sent to a premium rate number without your knowledge.

Even if there’s someone on the other end, they may pretend a person or an organisation you trust. They usually ask for very sensitive information such as name and address, passport numbers, banking details, credit card details etc. Therefore, remember, do not provide any personal information.

What is Survey call ?

An unknown number that is calling may belong to someone who is supposed to conduct a survey. More and more companies and organisations decide to collect information in this way. It is because the survey results are obtained very quickly and they tend to have higher response rates than paper equivalents.

They are also much cheaper than the traditional ones. You should not be afraid of them because they are quite secure and your answers are anonymous and confidential. However, because they are so popular, there are more and more call centres trying to reach you on the phone. Sometimes, your telephone does not stop ringing.

It is especially frustrating when you are busy at work or have something else to do. It is also quite annoying when such calls interrupt your peaceful weekend and free time. On our website you can check who is calling you, whether it is a person conducting a survey. And now it is your decision to participate in it or not.

North American Numbering Plan

The North American Numbering Plan (NANP) is a telephone numbering plan that encompasses twenty-five distinct regions in twenty countries primarily in North America, including the Caribbean.

The NANP was originally devised in the 1940s by AT&T for the Bell System and independent telephone operators in North America to unify the diverse local numbering plans that had been established in the preceding decades.

The NANP divides the territories of its members into numbering plan areas (NPAs) which are encoded numerically with a three-digit telephone number prefix, commonly called the area code. The telephone number consists of a three-digit central office code and a four-digit station number. The combination of an area code and the telephone number serves as a destination routing address in the public switched telephone network.

Twenty-four countries and territories share the North American Numbering Plan (NANP), with a single country code. The formatting convention for phone numbers is NPA-NXX-XXXX, where NPA is the three digit area code and NXX-XXXX is the seven digit subscriber number.

Originally, local calls within an area code could be placed by dialing NXX-XXXX, omitting the area code, known as 7-digit dialing. Only calling a destination in a different area code required dialing the destination area code, known as ten-digit dialing, but due to the need for additional telephone numbers in many regions, seven digit dialing is becoming rare in the United States.